Category Archives: Book Reviews

Reading for Fun vs. Reading for School

I definitely think reading for fun vs reading for school has something to do with the free will involved. People, especially when children, do not like doing what they are told to do. We like choices. For the classes I had that gave me a few choices of what to read, I actually enjoyed the books more than I did the books that the teacher picked out for us.

I also believe it may have something to do with maturity level and interests at a younger age. Some of the books we read, although very important, were not of much interest to us simply because we would rather read about dragons and wizards than Orwell, for example.

I just finished reading To Kill a Mockingbird and it got me thinking of my old high school days (all of three years ago).

I was remembering reading To Kill a Mockingbird my sophomore year as a class. I remember laughing at the obvious funny parts in the story but I didn’t really read the book. I read it just enough to write a paper but I didn’t really get into the novel.

I found that this time round with To Kill a Mockingbird, I actually read it… and thoroughly enjoyed it. It made me sad that I could have read this five years ago and felt the way I do now.

Then I got to thinking, this isn’t the first time this sort of thing has happened.

I ‘read’ Pride and Prejudice my senior year– I didn’t get past the first page. I just wasn’t interested in even…

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Book Review: The Century Trilogy

A few months ago, I was fortunate enough to come across The Century Trilogy while perusing the Barnes & Noble website.

The trilogy is written by Ken Follett and currently has 2 of the 3 books published. The second book, “Winter of the World” was released just last year and is available in hardcover.

Cover of “Fall of Giants”. Book 1 of 3

The first book of the trilogy, “Fall of Giants” is a #1 New York Times Bestseller and revolves around the happenings of five families in the early twentieth century.  The families represent different countries and socio-economic backgrounds; a Welsh mining family, Russian factory workers, upper class American family, and aristocratic English and German families. As the book progresses, you discover that all of these families become interrelated through the politics and events of the Great War.

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